Jason Guidry - DuPont State Recreational Forest Supervisor

I recently passed my one‐year mark as Forest Supervisor, taking the helm from David Brown. David’s accomplishments are too numerous to recount here but under his direction the foundation was established for how the Forest is managed, protected, and promoted. I have been challenged, as never before in my career, to maintain David’s high level of achievement while learning to operate one the most popular State Forests in the country. I am grateful for what he has left for me to manage and build upon.. . .

Continue reading:  Forest Supervisor Report – October 2014

 

There are so many wonderful people who give of their time and talent to make DuPont Forest the jewel that it is. When I think of our amazing volunteers, two people who always come to mind for me are Peg and Dan Bresnahan. I recently had the chance to ask the following questions of this dynamic duo:

What are your volunteer activities, past and present?

Both of us have worked the May and October Tour de Falls events both days, all day for ten years.  We have orchestrated litter pick-up in the Forest four to five Saturday mornings a year for the past ten years. We have volunteered at Canoe Day every year since its inception. In the beginning, we even hauled our grill from our house to the Forest. One year we dropped it getting it onto Dan’s truck! We have been parking lot greeters. Peg was on the FODF board for six years, Dan for four.  Peg served as membership chair for a several years.

What fuels your desire to volunteer in the Forest?

We both love to be outside and share our experience with those who don’t have the opportunities we have living next door to such a wondrous place.

What is your favorite way to recreate in the Forest?

We enjoy hiking.

Do you have a favorite trail? If so, which one and why is it your favorite?

Dan’s favorite trails are Big Rock and Mine Mountain. They are high line trails with wonderful views.

If you could be granted one wish for the forest, what would it be?

We would like fewer trails, preferring to see large tracts of land left completely alone for the wildlife. We believe the Forest is best served when treated with respect, where people can enjoy what the flora and fauna have to offer. Education is a big part of it. Everyone needs to learn how important our responsibility is to this precious acreage. We need to slow down and live with the natural world, recognize our connection to it. There is no need to crash through the Forest for thrills. Plenty of places are available for those experiences, and so few left for the act of simple appreciation

Our vision is to bring public school students from elementary and middle schools in North Carolina and other states into natural areas near their homes and schools. Merging the energy of young students with the energy of these outdoor places sets the stage for deeply felt experiences that will bring a “backyard” presence to North Carolina’s Standard Course of Study, particularly in Science. Our vision is to create in children a life-long love of nature and to do this in a way that enhances academic achievement, inspires the joy of living, and plants an understanding of the interconnectedness of all things.

Our vision is to bring public school students from elementary and middle schools in North Carolina and other states into natural areas near their homes and schools. Merging the energy of young students with the energy of these outdoor places sets the stage for deeply felt experiences that will bring a “backyard” presence to North Carolina’s Standard Course of Study, particularly in Science. Our vision is to create in children a life-long love of nature and to do this in a way that enhances academic achievement, inspires the joy of living, and plants an understanding of the interconnectedness of all things.

The first falls of the Little River, Bridal Veil is probably the most unique. First, it drops off an overhanging ledge which allows visitors to walk underneath (as shown in Last of the Mohicans). Read more